How to Limit Windows Update Bandwidth in Windows 10

How to Limit Windows Update Bandwidth in Windows 10

Have you experienced slow connection when your Windows 10 is performing Windows Update? It could be that your Windows Update is consuming a lot of bandwidth. We can change the settings in your Windows 10 to limit Windows Update Bandwidth.

Limit Windows Update Bandwidth Through Windows Settings

This step is the easiest step to limit Windows Update Bandwidth.

Open Windows Settings. You can either perform a shortcut Win + I or going through Start then Settings icon.

In Windows Settings, navigate through:

Update & Security > Windows Update > Advanced options > Delivery Optimization > Advanced options 
How to Limit Windows Update Bandwidth in Windows 10

Under Download Settings, put a check on both Limit how much bandwidth is used for downloading updates in the background and
Limit how much bandwidth is used for downloading updates in the foreground.

Move the slide bar depending on how much bandwidth will you provide your Windows Update. If you do not want to have a slow connection, put 20%.

Limit Windows Update Bandwidth Through Group Policy

I will not recommend these steps because they are more advanced. However, there are few more settings you can change in the Group Policy.

Open the Local Group Policy Editor by running the following command in the Run window or from the Start: gpedit.msc

In the Local Group Policy Editor, navigate through:

Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Deliver Optimization
How to Limit Windows Update Bandwidth in Windows 10

Open the Maximum Download Bandwidth (in KB/s) settings. Select Enabled and input the download bandwidth in KB/s under Maximum Download Bandwidth (in KB/s). This will limit by KB/s and not in percentage.

I prefer the former (via Windows Settings) than the latter (via Local Group Policy Editor) because it is based on percentage. However, I gave you two options to limit Windows Update bandwidth in Windows 10. Whichever you choose will work fine.

That is it! That is how you limit Windows Update bandwidth in Windows 10. You will not experience any bandwidth issues when your Windows 10 is updating. Not unless, you have connectivity issues with your Internet.

How to Use SSH on Windows Systems

Introduction

Image result for sshSSH or Secure Shell is  a cryptographic network protocol for operating network services securely over an unsecured network (Wikipedia). If you need to access a server with SSH, you will have to use an SSH client. Linux and Mac OS systems have built-in SSH clients while Windows does not have any built in SSH clients.

In this tutorial, we will show you how to use SSH on Windows.

Use SSH on Windows

Since Windows does not have a built in SSH client, we will have to download and install an SSH client. There are few SSH clients that can be downloaded. Among these are Cygwin, Putty, FireSSH and Secure Shell App. FireSSH is a plugin for Mozilla Firefox. Secure Shell App is an extension for Google Chrome. If you prefer using browser extensions, choose between FireSSH or Secure Shell App. Cygwin is more like making your system be aware of Unix like commands. I do not prefer using Cygwin. I prefer using Putty thus the purpose of this tutorial.

We will be using the most widely used SSH client in Windows, which is Putty. Here are the steps in acquiring Putty to use SSH on Windows:

  1. All you have to do is download the MSI file (Windows Installer) in this link https://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/latest.html. If you are using a 32-bit operating system, select the 32-bit link. Otherwise, use the 64-bit link.
  2. Afterwards, execute and install the downloaded file.
  3. Locate and run Putty.exe. This can be located in your Start Menu.

You should see a configuration window for Putty like this:

how to Use SSH on Windows

From the configuration window, you can set the host name or IP address of the server and click Open button.

You can read more about Putty from this link: https://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/faq.html

That’s it! That’s how you can use SSH on Windows. Let me know if you have any questions.